Tassimo Re-Usable Pods

Tassimo Re-Usable Pods

UPDATE (Apr 2016): Thanks to Gilly for posting a link to a video showing someone that has made a re-usable Tassimo pod!  It doesn’t appear to be 3D printer (as the surface is very shiny) so hopefully these will be available soon.  Note that you’ll still need to know what barcode to put on the pod for the different types of drink (heat, pressure and volume of water is all controlled by the barcode).  View the YouTube video here:

I recently bought a Tassimo (Bosch TAS6515GB) Coffee maker for the Fresh Mango UK office and while I do love it, the cost of the pods is pretty high but more frustratingly the amount of plastic waste produced is appalling.

Cheapest Option for Buying Tassimo Pods

In terms of cost, I purchase the pods 40 at a time via an Amazon Subscription as this seems to be the cheapest way to buy them and its pretty convenient.

Recycling Tassimo Pods

In the UK the easiest way we’ve found to recycle not only the pods but the foil-type bads the pods come in is via the TerraCycle project (www.terracycle.co.uk) although oddly there is a waiting list to join the Tassimo Recycling ‘brigade’ so sign up ASAP and start collecting the empty pods.

Reusable Tassimo Pods

Re-usable Pod Kits

Oddly there have only been a handful of companies offering re-usable Tassimo Pods and so far no-one has created one that’s any good.  My Cap (www.my-cap.com) offer a kit that is actually just a Tassimo pod with a couple of holes punched in it and a rubber bung to plug those holes.  I haven’t used one myself but all reviews I’ve read state that they are very poor and, leak and half the time the plugs pop out due to the extreme pressure in the machine.

Do It Yourself

A user here on instructables.com says he reuses his pods himself doing the following:

I have refilled used Tassimo Nabob Columbian pods with some success. I first cut an oval hole in the foil of the pod, well away from the barcode. I use an xacto knife and make the hole about 1/4 x 3/8 inch in size with a smooth curve all the way around so it won’t tear. I then hold the pod under a tap, letting water splash into the hole. It’s amazing how fast the old grounds flush out, leaving the interior clean. Next I spoon in coffee of my choice (usually Columbian Arabica) until the pod is nearly filled. I have to regularly shake the pod from side-to-side to distribute the coffee. The last step is to cut a patch from a piece of aluminum duct tape, allowing up to 1/4 inch of overlap all the way around the hole. I then remove the adhesive-covering paper and apply the patch. I burnish it with the spoon everywhere it contacts the original foil. The pod is then ready to use. I always get some leakage, unfortunately, but usually I can collect it in my cup by repositioning it. Rarely do any grounds leak out.

What Next?  Creating a Re-usable Tassimo Pod

I’m amazed a plastic products manufacturer in China or similar responsive/flexible manufacturing region haven’t filled the gap in this market with a simple two piece pod that’s threaded in the middle.  The larger pods used for ‘latte’ drinks are plenty big enough to accommodate the space required for a threaded collar on the inside along with two rubber O-rings to allow for a good seal of the inner pipe and the coffee chamber while ensuring the intake pipe at the back is properly aligned.

They could sell those bad boys for $5 each and I’d buy some – it’d pay for itself in no time at all, allow me to use my own coffee of choice and reduce the waste to zero!

 

 

 

 

Bob McKay

About Bob McKay

Bob McKay works at Perfect Image, is a father, programmer and a self confessed techie-geek type.

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12 comments on «Tassimo Re-Usable Pods»

  1. Jude says:

    That idea wouldn’t even need help from shark tank to make a million dollars.

  2. Paul H says:

    Great thought re: screwable set. C’mon someone please make them.

    I love my daily morning Costa Tassimo coffee’s but am planning on canning them as while the cost isn’t too bad (like Bob I use Amazon) the waste is really appalling, and starting to sit heavy on my conscience…

  3. Gilly Gunson says:

    There’s a video on YouTube showing this very thing, but I have no idea where or who to contact re this.

    http://youtu.be/G61Q5CJF2lk

    1. Bob McKay says:

      Awesome – thanks Gilly!

  4. Gilly Gunson says:

    How about someone putting a 3D printer to some properly good use?

    1. Bob McKay says:

      Hey Gilly,
      I wondered the same thing but I suspect that the plastic probably wouldn’t withstand the heat (the plastic used is obviously made with a low melting point). The thing is, if Tassimo made these, I’d pay $20 per re-usable pod. If they don’t make them, they are going to appear online (authorized or not) and they’ll lose out big time.

      1. Gilly Gunson says:

        I’m not sure if a Tassimo-alike machine can be made as a generic yet (and then you might find re-usable pods to go with them) but mine was free. However, I won’t subscribe to the overpriced pods and Eco-disaster which is the waste plastic and foil they generate. I’ve had a go at refilling one and it’s moderately to very successful, but relies on a source of fresh, used pods.

  5. Jimmy Neebur says:

    Tassimo tdiscs are still protected by patents so no generic or non-Tassimo refillable disc can technically be sold as yet. The red refillable disc in the Youtube video doesn’t look to have a filter in it so the coffee will be full of gunky residue; like the bottom of a cafetiere. The video poster seems to be playing coy about it and not responding to queries.

    1. Bob McKay says:

      Absolutely but given the environmental impact of the discs, if Tassimo don’t release their own re-usable disc soon, they are going start appearing on the black market as generic ‘re-usable pods’. No logo so no obvious brand infringement, patent fights are much more arduous and costly (and pointless against lots of small traders and/or a small manufacturing outfits in china). Personally, I’d happily pay £20 per re-usable pod from Tassimo if it gave me 100+ uses.

    1. Bob McKay says:

      Thanks – very interesting! 1000 rubles seems to be about $15 USD (£10 GBP), I wonder if they deliver to to the West.

    2. ralph middleton says:

      This link does not work, do you have another ?

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